President Mohamed Bazoum of Niger Republic detained by the presidential guard | ANG
  • March 2, 2024

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Nigerien President Mohamed Bazoum was detained in Niamey on Wednesday by the presidential guard after “talks” which failed and the army issued “an ultimatum” to the guard, we learned from a source close to the presidency.

“At the end of the talks, the presidential guard refused to release the president, the army gave him an ultimatum”, declared this source on condition of anonymity, following a “movement of mood” of members of the presidential guard who blocked access to the presidency in Niamey.

In a message posted on Twitter, renamed “X”, the presidency of Niger indicates that on Wednesday morning, “elements of the presidential guard (GP) engaged in an anti-republican mood movement and tried in vain to obtain the support of the national armed forces and the national guard”.

“The army and the national guard are ready to attack the elements of the GP involved in this mood swing if they do not return to better feelings”, adds the presidency, affirming that “the President of the Republic and his family are doing well. ”

The history of Niger, a former French colony, a poor country plagued by jihadist violence, has been marked by putschs and attempted coups since its independence in 1960.

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